Over in  The Schwilly Family Musicians Facebook Group I was asking about what excuses people are allowing to hold them back.

As it turns out I’ve had a LOT of the same excuses hold me back over the years. So I reckon it would be useful for you to know how I put them behind me.

Interested? Here we go!

1 – I’m Tired/Out of Shape:

This one hits REAL close to home. On a road trip last summer, I got to the point where I couldn’t even sit in my car comfortably. And every time I ate, I felt an unearthly pressure in my chest. 

At one time in my life I was a near Olympic level athlete. And my wife was antsy to start having kids (our first is due THIS December!). So hitting a low point like that was a real eye-opener.

One thing I can truly attest to is that “you ARE what you eat”. That didn’t mean so much to me when I was in my 20’s. I must have been eating steel and adrenaline. But now that my “grown up” body has taken over, it’s time for me to think in longer terms as far as my health.

After I got home from that trip I discovered a book called “The End of Dieting: How To Live for Life“. And this book has changed my life. Within a few days of eating the recipes from Dr. Furhman’s website my CONSTANT heartburn, which had been plaguing me for decades went away. I also lost 20 pounds and gained a TON of energy within the first month after changing my diet.

 2 – I Don’t Know What to do Next:

Who HASN’T been there? Especially with the OVERWHELMING amount of information online, it’s way too easy to get stuck in “learning” mode, which ultimately prevents you from taking action.

If you don’t know what your next step should be, look around for someone that’s where you want to be and follow their lead. 

You can ALWAYS ask me what your next step should be. And I will ALWAYS have an answer for you. So the only question that remains is: “Will you listen AND take action?”

3 – I Don’t Have Enough Money

Hey, you’re talking to a guy that was homeless and unemployed when I decided to take ownership of my future. I KNOW about not having money. It’s practically my scientific speciality 😉

How did I do it? I sold my blood plasma to pay for my website and email list. Then, I got a job. Yes, a J-O-B! And instead of getting an apartment, I continued to live in my van and invested that money into a $1,000 training course on how to build entrepreneurial businesses online and OTHER business related investments.

Call center jobs are pretty easy to come by in the U.S. and they are pretty easy to leave, which makes them GREAT opportunities for Musicpreneurs.

And even if there weren’t any call centers in my area, I would have sold fruit by the side of the highway or showed up at the Home Depot parking lot at 5am everyday to stand in line with the rest of my people looking to improve their lives.

Why? Because I wanted it THAT bad. How bad do YOU want it?

Already have a job, but a bunch of bills and responsibilities to go along with it?

Here’s a little something I learned more recently that made it so I had the $3,500 I recently invested into my business: PAY YOURSELF FIRST. It’s pretty simple. For EVERY dollar you make, AS SOON AS it hits your bank account, take a dime (10%) and use it to either pay down a credit card or stuff it in a piggy bank until you need it for your business.

It will force you to get creative about fulfilling your other financial obligations. But they will still get met AND you’ll have money to invest in yourself when you need it.

4 – I Don’t Have Enough Time

There was a point when my business was growing but I was still tethered to my day job to make ends meet. So I hit a glass ceiling in the growth of my business because I didn’t have enough time to put into scaling it up. Then I discovered “The 4-Hour Workweek” by Tim Ferriss. It’s seriously the best $15 ANY entrepreneur can invest in their career. Within 4 months of buying that book I left my last-ever day job for good.

Also, “Pay Yourself First” applies to time just as much as money. Before I do any client work, or marketing, or even write you these emails, I spend 1-2 hours working on building my business. Currently I spend that daily time working on the 2.0 version of the “Musicpreneur Apprentice Program”.

If that means taking a later shift at the factory, do it. If that means getting up at the butt-crack of dawn, do it. Again, how bad do you want it?

5 – Location

Technology trumps geography. Anyone with an internet signal has access to BILLIONS of potential fans.

Sure you can move to Nashville. But you’ll face an INSANE amount of competition in a horrifically “cliquish” environment. 

OR you can set up a comfortable music space in your home out in the forest and use the interwebs to grow > engage > and monetize your fanbase. 

I love my home and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. And I certainly didn’t leave the backbiting, childish, political, corporate world just to get into the same type of environment. In fact, I stay away from anything “Music In-DUH-stry” related as much as possible. I’ve personally found that success is much more attainable without all that BS.

6 – It’s Not Perfect Yet

In an artistic field, like music, perfection is an illusion. It’s entirely subjective and everyone who consumes your music has their own idea of what “perfection” is.

As a Musicpreneur, you don’t have to get it perfect. You just have to get it going. 

Lack of ACTION is what’s holding you back, not lack of perfection.

7 – Technology is Hard

Seriously? You’ve probably already learned to operate musical equipment and recording programs that are MUCH more complicated than WordPress.

Sure, technology might have been “hard” in the 90’s. But nowadays it’s quite user-friendly and any software company worth their weight in bubbles has Tech Support and Customer Service that will help you overcome any obstacles you encounter.

And there’s always the option of hiring some help with all that money you saved by paying yourself first.

8 – No One Buys Music Anymore

That’s a myth. I just bought some music TODAY. But don’t take my word for it. Here’s Vlad’s comment from that post: 

“I believed this for a long while. Oddly enough it’s when I started CHARGING for my music that I realized it wasn’t true at all. Someone paid me $20 for my $3 EP on Saturday. And a majority of buyers have paid OVER my asking price. People are awesome.”

Welp. I’m out of excuses. And I hope you are too 😉

A lot of music biz teachers will tell you that you should commit time to releasing cover songs on YouTube because you’ll get all kinds of organic growth and attention.

I’m not saying that they’re are lying to you. But I will tell you that they’re not giving you the whole story.

In fact, as far as I’m concerned, they’re sending you on a wild goose chase. And there are MUCH better things to spend your time on.

It’s true that YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine. So if you post songs that people are ALREADY looking for, you can show up in those searches.

So your Lady Gaga covers might get some traction. But your TOTO covers probably won’t.

(Interesting side note: “TOTO” is also a brand of toilets in Japan which caused major confusion during their first Asian tour.)

Now back to your regularly scheduled programing…

In order to REALLY make that strategy work, what you have to do is cover POPULAR songs as soon as they are released. I’m talking the DAY they are released or within a few days at most.

Remember when Adelle released “Hello” and everybody and their cousin covered it on YouTube?

The problem there is that you put yourself in a situation with a LOT of competition…

…AND you’re playing someone else’s songs.

So if your goal is to build an audience for your ORIGINAL music, before you put anymore time into YouTube covers you should try something different.

Just trust me…

And follow my instructions exactly for a 7-day Facebook Live challenge.

Here are the rules:

Each day go on Facebook Live and play one of YOUR songs.

Don’t do it from your fan page. Do it from your personal profile. More people will see it that way.

Before you hit “Go Live” add a link to your squeeze page in the video description.

Mention 3 different calls-to-action during the broadcast:

1: ”Please turn on my live notifications.”

2: “Please share this video or invite people to join.”

3: “Please subscribe to my email list.”

That’s it.

I promise that if you do that for 7 days in a row, you will not only get MORE subscribers and engagement out of it than your last attempt at a YouTube cover, you’ll do it playing your own songs.

For extra credit try it out on other platforms where you can broadcast live like: Periscope, Twitter, Instagram, & YouTube.

Not only will it help you identify which social media platforms are the most responsive for YOUR original music, you can also repurpose the videos as blog posts for your own website and put them into rotation as content that sends traffic there!

In the Musicpreneur Apprentice Program we not only talk about how you can use Facebook Live to grow your community, we also go into great detail about how to MONETIZE it.

Just ask Bad Mary, a punk band from New York who made a couple hundred bucks the FIRST time they broadcasted a rehearsal on Facebook Live.

You in? Here’s the link to join:

http://schwillyfamilymusicians.teachable.com/p/musicpreneurapprenticeprogram/

Here’s a question I get every now and again… and again:

“What does ‘Schwilly Family’ mean?”

The short answer is: A “Schwilly” is the ultimate community oriented music super-fan.

A bunch of us used to reek havoc across the midwest music festival scene. ESPECIALLY Hookahville. At some point along the way, someone announced, “We’re a family of Schwillies!”

The name of my business is a tribute to where I came from and, more importantly, a constant reminder of WHY I do it.

When I gave one musician that answer to his question, he proceeded to tell me about how is wife busted out laughing at the name.

Well, that’s ANOTHER great benefit to the Schwilly Family “brand”! It comes with free smiles included 😉 And it’s a HECK of a lot catchier than “Music Marketing This” or “Music Business That”.

Remember: You’re not really building an “audience”. It’s more like you’re starting a club, a group of soon-to-be friends, or found family. Isn’t that a MUCH cooler thing than trying to be part of an “industry”?

The MOST IMPORTANT element of a “brand” is a feeling of belonging to an EXCLUSIVE group of people you respect and appreciate.

A LOT of people told me I was crazy for using “Schwilly Family” as my brand. And the truth is, it’s NOT for everybody. And it’s not meant to be.

It’s for YOU.

And I KNOW that being “Schwilly” has become a part of your identity and a badge you wear with pride. That, my friend, is what creates a TRULY great “brand”.

The fact that outsiders have no idea what it refers to is irrelevant. Because creating a brand that is MEANINGFUL is much more valuable than creating a brand that is instantly recognizable. 

“Apple” certainly didn’t become synonymous with “computers” overnight! 

If I had to sum up “branding” in once sentence, I would say: “Branding is NOTHING MORE than figuring out what you’re all about and learning how to express it.”

It can also be summed up (even better) by a quote from Simon Sinek:

“People don’t buy WHAT you do. They buy WHY you do it.”

One of the biggest problems with the educational resources you come across online nowadays is a tendency to overcomplicate things.

Many educators feel that, in order to provide value that equals the price they charge, they must to give you 10 hours of videos, complete with excessive jargon and complicated explanations…

…as if the harder it is for you to learn, the more valuable it is.

I have figured out that I can provide more VALUE in 5 minutes by giving you information in a way that you understand, which you can apply and see RESULTS from on the same day I give it to you.

Pretty much everything we do in the Musicpreneur Apprentice Program  contributes to building your “brand”. But you’ll probably never hear me use that word again.

I just got of the phone with a dear, old friend. From way back before “Schwilly” was even a thing.

One of the BEST singers I’ve ever known. She’s been toiling away the last 2 decades in the midwest jamband scene. Trying to make a name for herself.

We haven’t spoken in a while. But we were pretty tight back then. And she burst into tears the moment she heard my voice.

I asked how she’s been, what she’s been up to, if she’s made it BIG yet.

I always figured she would. Those pipes of hers are destined for glory.

“Nope”, she said. “I’m still just where I was when you left Ohio.” 

“Every band on the scene wants me to sit in with them. Or sing lead female backup. I can make money playing covers, but when it comes to my original music, nobody’s interested.”

“Everybody just wants me to be their dancing monkey.”

I KNOW her original music. It’s plenty good. Bluesy, rootsy, soulful. Like the lovechild of Bill Withers and Janis Joplin. She’s THAT good.

She went on to tell me about how she’s been trying to put a band together for at least a decade. But she can’t get anyone to stick around.

All the good players in Columbus want to either play in high-paid cover bands or join one of the infamous local jambands (still waiting for MY turn to join Ekoostik Hookah).

It all came to a head when she spent her life-savings on some studio time and musicians to at least get an album of HER music down on record.

Once it was complete she started shopping it around to various local labels to try to get some backing, or promotion, or whatever it is that labels do nowadays.

Then she hit a brick wall.

A label owner who also happens to be a festival producer, so they already had a working relationship, gave her (what he thought to be) the honest truth:

“There’s no market for this. Give it up. You’ll never be anything more than a strong female vocalist for hire. So get used to it and figure out a way to enjoy it.”

This devastated her.

She resigned herself to the fact that everything she had hoped for and dreamt of was a waste of her youth. And she slid into a year and a half of depression and self-destructive behavior. 

Well, last week we reconnected on Facebook and she caught wind of this “internet thing” I’ve been doing with musicians.

And, boy, was I GLAD to hear from her! 

The whole reason I got into this “internet thing” was to help out the musicians that I’ve known and loved throughout my life. 

Unfortunately, very few of them have ever gotten on board with what I’ve been doing. They are mostly still trapped in the “old way” of doing things.

I only wish she had looked me up earlier.

Because I know EXACTLY how to build an audience for her original music. And I’m stoked to be able to relieve her of the heartbreak that she’s been through and re-establish the path toward her dreams.

So if you have had experiences like this along the way to building your music career, and nothing the “in-DUH-stry” tells you to do seems to be working, join the Musicpreneur Apprentice Program today:

http://schwillyfamilymusicians.teachable.com/p/musicpreneurapprenticeprogram/

It works. Fast. Almost instantly, in fact. At least as far as finding TRUE fans that want to hear YOUR music and become part of YOUR community. 

The rest is just a matter putting one foot in front of the other as I show you exactly which steps to take.

At coffee, I run into everyone. Our town only has one coffee shop, so it’s easy to find everyone there. I ran into a couple of musicians that I’ve jammed with, and I dig their tunes! Well, like me, they signed up for Distrokid – and like me, they have the eternal musician’s struggle: Record, listen, hear the mistakes, re-record, listen, hear something “lacking”, re-re-record, listen – and so on.

The thing that a lot of us (musicians, writers, artists, people) do is that we work hard on whatever our passion is, look at it, and then find everything wrong with it. Even when it’s someone like me who LOVES the little mistakes (read: “nuances”) that make things imperfect, I constantly hear things that need to be fixed. Even when a recording is produced and polished, I love having a little something that is off in it, but it has to be just the right kind of wrong.

So many of us keep shelving things because of those little mistakes. The wrong drum hit at that moment, a wrong note hit, a line of lyric misspoken – more and more things make us keep our music/art to ourselves.

 

WRONG

 

Listen to some of the great recordings of the past. Listen to Zeppelin live at The BBC, listen to Tom Waits’ recordings in a barn (or his amazing VH1 Storytellers), listen to BB King live, or John Fogerty! They all have these moments that the rest of us struggle with! And, what do they do? They keep going! They released the music, they let the art out! Sure, a lot of artists rely on the beauty of our technology to help produce a “perfect” track…. No comment.

So, what do we do? Do we allow our mistakes to be a little part of our performances and recordings? Do we keep all of this wonderful music, writing, art to ourselves out of fear of our worste critic (it’s ourselves – The Storyteller), or maybe we just do something crazy like emphasize the mistake?! Whatever we decide to do, just get the art out there! Perfect or not, just bloody let it out!

Someone once asked the rhetorical, “what if Hendrix had left his music on a tape in the studio instead of releasing it or playing shows? What about Kurt Cobain or Joe Cocker? What about Janis Joplin? They all made mistakes, hit “wrong” notes, they were all perfectly human on their recordings – so why can’t you be?”

That was the thing that pushed me over the edge. Sure, I still want things mixed and sounding like they do in my mind – but if there’s this or that on there – a dog or car in the background, or a note that doesn’t quite go with the tune, or even a ragged vocal moment – I let it sit for a while before I say I need to try again. And, as I let it sit, they grow on me and I learn to love those little moments in the songs. Even the hiss of the amp can sometimes add another dimension to what I’ve been working on.

It gets worse (or “less perfect”) when playing live. When I was playing with a band, I would mess up a lot, I mean a lot. Now that I play solo shows… I mess up even more! It doesn’t matter to the audience how many things I have to think about; which pedal should be pressed, what distance I should stay from the mic, switching from a barred aug9 chord to an open min7th… Most audience members don’t ****ing care. They only care if it sounds good and they’re having fun. So, I’m learning (yes, still in the process) to roll with the punches of messing up on stage. In fact, a few of the screw-ups I’ve made on stage gave me ideas to change the songs for the better! How cool is that?!

So, let the mistakes be heard! Maybe do something crazy and accentuate them! Don’t do a million takes to try and make it perfect, you’ll never be satisfied – I know I’m rarely satisfied at the first dozen listens. I’ll always have the struggle of the musician who loves the sound of raw music and emotion mixed with a person who is, in many ways, a perfectionist about how I want things to sound or be presented. I’m letting the former win the fights more and more just so I can get the music out there. Even if only one person hears it and enjoys it on any level – that’s better than none.

So, I will continue to release music, wrong notes and all.
 

Now, while I appreciate all forms of music, I think that these classic jazz musicians nailed it with their quotes:

“There are no wrong notes; some are just more right than others.”
—Thelonius Monk

“It’s not the note you play that’s the wrong note – it’s the note you play afterwards that makes it right or wrong.”
—Miles Davis

“There’s no such thing as a wrong note.”
–Art Tatum

“Do not fear mistakes. There are none.”
—Miles Davis

“There are no wrong notes, only wrong resolutions”
—Bill Evans

“I played the wrong, wrong notes.”
—Thelonious Monk

Musicians can be the targets of a LOT of harsh words.

It sucks when coming from strangers. But it cuts EXTRA deep when they come from “supposed” friends.

Does any of this sound familiar to you?

“Are you enjoying your hobby?”

“Honestly, I think your band sucks and I’d rather be dead than caught on a stage with you.” 

“You’ll never make money doing that. When are you going to get a REAL job?”

“You’re just a singer. Not a REAL musician. Besides, you’re only a woman so you don’t know what you’re talking about.”

“You can’t fill a phone both with people that want to hear YOUR music!”

“You’re a musician, right? Can I get some weed from you?”

“Where are you playing next? So I can NOT be there.”

“Your music sucks!”

“You look like Muhammed Ali’s retarded cousin when you rap!”

“Gosh you’re so talented! Why don’t you put on some makeup, you know, fix yourself up a little, lose some weight and do some songs people actually know?”

Or one of my personal favs:

“Dude! If I hear another self-promotion about your shytty band I’m gonna fyck you up! Yes, I watched your videos and you can’t sing worth shyt! You give Utah a bad name and image, the only reason you’re ranked on ReverbNation is because ALL YOU DO is sit home and are an internet slut, do you play anywhere besides Fats?? Mishell is too nice to say no. I am going to message every bluesman in town and let them know you’re a fraud and if it weren’t for the internet you’d be unheard of! Every time I log in I get raped by 10,000 of your posts! SHUT THE FUCJ UP BEFORE I POST PUBLIC HOW SHYTTY YOU REALLY ARE STICK TO ART YOU TONE DEF FRAUD!”

My standard, practical advice normally consists of “Haters are a sign of success” and, “That’s the beauty of the internet, you can block those people”.

But the other night, during office hours for the Musicpreneur Apprentice Program we dove a bit deeper and I shared some advice that I’m sure you could use as well.

It comes from a book I recommend called The Four Agreements (by Don Miguel Ruiz). It’s a practical guide to personal freedom and inner peace, based on Ancient Toltec Wisdom. 

There are 4 agreements you can make that will give you immunity to such cutting remarks. Fortunately, you make these agreements with yourself, so there ARE within reach:

Be Impeccable With Your Word

Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using your words to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love.

Don’t Take Anything Personally

Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream. When you are immune to the opinions and action of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering.

Don’t Make Assumptions

Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness, and drama, With just this one agreement you can completely transform your life.

Always Do Your Best

Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to when you are sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgement, self-abuse, and regret.

Of course I, myself, have not yet perfected these agreements. But anytime I feel down, I review them to see if I am breaking one of them. It always turns out that I am. I now have the tools to undo the damage that is done to my psyche by harsh words from others, AND from myself. And I want YOU to have these tools at your disposal as well 😉

Can YOU make these agreements with yourself? I believe that you can!

For more wisdom, advice and inspiration for independent musicians, subscribe to my email list using the link, wherever it may be.

If you know any musicians that have been on the receiving end of such harsh words, which by my calculation would be EVERY musician you know, please share this with them. That’s all for today 😉

Onward!

Truer words have never been spoken.  That is why I’m using this quote from an interview, I recently watched, as the title of this article.  The quote is from my good friend Nate Compton, front man of ELISIUM, a national touring indie band.  In the interview, which you can watch below, Nate talks about his experience traveling the country playing music and tries to answer a question he is asked a great deal.  How do you know it’s the right time to quit your job and go on tour?  This very question is one that I have wrestled with many times and am wrestling now as I write this post.  

But, who am I?

My name is Greg Barrett.  I play drums for a regional touring act on the verge of going national.  For the past three years my band has been the proverbial weekend road warrior.  I also do session work for a local recording studio from time to time.  I’ve worked my entire life to get to the point where I’m currently at musically, and I honestly believe that I was put on this earth for the purpose of playing music.  It was obvious from the time I was three that I would be following this path and chasing the dream.

And, just like my buddy Nate was a few short years ago, I’m standing on the edge of the cliff trying to decide whether or not to jump?  Should I quit my job, to do what I love, or continue to work full time.  Should you?  Nate did, and believe me it’s a hard but fulfilling road.  But don’t take my word for it, after reading this article, watch his interview.

First off, let’s cut to the chase and determine if you/your band is ready to take to the roads.  Have you established yourself in your home market?  Are you getting good enough guarantees and positive feedback in your home market to warrant branching out into new radius based test markets?  Assuming you already have merchandise, are you moving it well at your live shows?  Is everyone in your crew on the same page?   Is your branding on point?

Branding?   What’s that?  We’re a band, not a business… WRONG!!!

The list could go on and on and on, but all of them are legitimate questions that need to be addressed.  All good topics to revisit in later articles, especially branding.  We’ll cover the first few for now.

Welcome my friends to indie touring!  

Is everyone in your team on the same page?  They had better be if you’re planning to spend days, weeks, or months at a time in a smelly, cramped, van.  You will all be running on minimal sleep and a diet of who knows where the next meal is coming from.  Hotel rooms will be a rarely afforded luxury, so you’ll be mostly sleeping in the van, and showering at truck stops and gyms.  The gym option is a great choice!   Let’s face it, who couldn’t use some exercise?  Just make sure to join a national chain.   Needless to say, the last thing you want is to be out midway through a tour, 900 miles from home and a member decide the road isn’t for him/her.  Everyone in that van should have the same drive, determination, and work ethic.  Everyone should have a designated job to do and be pulling their weight.  You are about to leave the happy-go-lucky and comfortable world of music as a hobby and enter the realm of full time, always on call, real deal music is my JOB.  Is everyone willing and able to completely uproot from normal life, sell off most everything not needed to be as debt free as possible and not get paid often?  You had best be finding out!  Unless of course you are loaded to the gills and able to just finance or bank roll a tour, a bus, or accommodate your crew every night with lodging, food, and pay.  Or, you already have major label backing and enough leverage in your deal that they provide for all of it.  Even most of the signed bands out there are lucky to be provided with a 15 passenger van and trailer.

Lets focus on your home and radius markets.  

Your home market is your first anchor.  Assuming that you’ve established a healthy following already in your hometown, you should be drawing sizable crowds, getting reasonably good venue guarantees, and be moving merch well.  These two latter points will be key to survival in new markets where you will be working to replicate that hometown market all over again.  This never stops.  Each time you win a large following, that market becomes an anchor.  You should be working to establish these anchors roughly 3 to 5 hours apart for weekend strings and as far out as 9 plus hours for tours.  Guarantees in new test markets will, in all likelihood, be minimal at best if any at all.  There will be a lot of times starting out when fuel and food between stops is a luxury only afforded by your merch sales.  That’s where those anchors come into play.  Routing more than a couple test market stops between your “meat and potato” anchor stops WILL break the budget.  So will running out of merch… DON’T DO THAT!

Survival on tour is all about budgeting and being prepared for whatever gets thrown at you.  You can never count 100% on getting paid your full guarantee or being paid at all for every date booked, even with signed contracts.  This is especially true when you’re working new rooms and contacts.  Any tour that ends up breaking even should be considered a success.  If you do turn a profit after all the expenses, then that’s a huge success!  The real objective is to get your name out there in new markets and build that following.

The whole landscape of the music business is shifting and constantly changing.  A recent topic of debate among many of my peers has been, is touring profitable anymore?  I have many friends on both sides of that fence.  Some who got in the game when venue pay and general attendance were high, which allowed them to generate large enough national followings to still warrant hefty guarantees, are now in the catch 22 of “always on tour”.  They simply can’t afford to not be on tour full time now.  On the other side, with guarantees way lower, it may be more profitable to tap into other revenue streams, than to try to stay out on the road all the time.  The bottom line is, touring is still the most effective means of developing a strong following.  People still love to see a killer live show and actually meet the artists.

Don’t let me discourage you, but be aware of what you are about to do.  Making the jump from hobby to career is no smooth path.  It’s a lot of work.  Touring can actually be fun, rewarding, and give you a whole new perspective on life.  It will broaden your horizons, make you laugh, cry, and open your eyes to that big world outside of your box.  Nothing beats the feeling of knowing you left every ounce of yourself that you had to give on that stage night after night.

Is there ever going to be a “right time”?  Probably not…

But, as my friend Wade Sutton from Rocket to the Stars says, “Sometimes you jump. Sometimes you get pushed.  Either way, you’re going to learn to fly.”

Alright, there’s my two cents, now watch Nate’s interview, and go start planning that maiden tour!

Greg Barrett is the drummer for the indie rock band Seasons of Me, session musician for The Sound Asylum Recording & Mastering Studio, and follower/student of trends and marketing strategies in the new music industry.  You can read his bio on his artist page at the Saluda Cymbals web site and check out his band at their official site using the links below.

Greg Barrett at Saluda Cymbals